Thursday, June 16, 2011

Dublin in the Green Oul' Times

This is delightful: a 'collaborative' effort between photographers Paul Walsh and Charles W. Cushman, spanning fifty years.

Just go to the site and scroll over each picture from 1961 to see the same view in 2011. One thing that struck me: we have a lot more trees in Dublin nowadays...

3 comments:

  1. There's something about those old camera films. They look great.

    Hmm. Do we really need so many road markings and traffic lights today?

    They're ugly. (And I'm not sure they're of much help either).

    Isn't it kind of analogous to the way in which agents co-ordinate themselves within a free market?

    ReplyDelete
  2. @roc

    Yep: reminds me of the recent experiments in Drachten and other European towns: they went retro - removing all the signs and markings - and, horror of horrors, accidents declined!

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiegel/0,1518,448747,00.html

    Glad to see you're turning Hayekian roc :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ah now. I wouldn't go that far! :)

    I saw those traffic experiments. Very enlightening. Our local authorities would have their work cut out undoing all their work of the last ten years though!

    I like the ideal of a self regulating market. But it is no surprise that when a market and society is so largely driven by values like the idealisation of greed and pride etc, even if only as an aid to selling, that we end up as we do.

    My opinion is only that a benevolent free market requires an adequately human (in all its potential) underlying moral and cultural basis to give it its characteristic and direction. We don't have that - far too much we treat the bulk of people merely as (covetous) cogs in a machine in our freemarket system.

    You remember 15 years ago thinkers such as Charles Handy in 'The Empty Raincoat' thought we would grow beyond this. But it seems to me like it has only got worse.

    Michael Polanyi would be the free market thinker who inspires me rather than von Hayek. Also, what Adam Smith set out in his 'Theory of moral sentiments' wrt the kind of understanding we all need to have of ourselves as agents of the 'invisible hand'.

    It's a fascinating area of thinking.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...